Daisy’s Dripping Biscuits

Women's sphere The Sun Newspaper

In 1919, Daisy of Erskineville submitted her recipe for Dripping Biscuits to the ‘Women’s Sphere’ page of Sydney’s The Sun Newspaper. Daisy’s recipe appeared in the ‘Housewives’ Exchange’ column: ‘any kind of useful wrinkle concerning the home-cooking,
dressmaking, care of children-will find a place in this column.’ 

The recipe for dripping biscuits appeared amongst several recipes submitted by residents of Sydney, which included wheatmeal pastry, apple strudel, sponge cake, carrot pudding, and honey toffee.

Erskineville Dripping Biscuits

The Sun (Sydney) Sunday, 12 October 1919

Daisy’s recipe uses dripping, or beef fat in place of the butter or oil that most biscuit recipes tend to use today. In 1919 beef dripping would have been an inexpensive ingredient, a by-product of family cooking, dripping being the fat that dripped from roasting meat. Today, beef dripping is sold at the supermarket at great expense as a gourmet ingredient.

The recipe appears pretty straight forward right up until the direction is reached to add ‘sufficient flour’ and ‘bake in a brisk oven’ and finally ‘a little cornflour added to the flour is an improvement.’ How much? How hot? For how long?

Would that be a Britsh Imperial measure of sufficiency?

Well, there’s nothing for it but to pre-heat the oven to ‘brisk’ and get down to business with a beater and some rendered beef fat…

Daisy’s Dripping Biscuits
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Chamberlain Terrace – 64, 66 & 68 John Street Erskineville

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Chamberlain Terrace Erskineville

Chamberlain Terrace (64, 66, & 68 John Street Erskineville) is located on the western side of John Street Erskineville, near Albert Street. The terrace makes its first appearance in the 1885 edition of the Sands Directory, indicating it was likely completed the previous year. Continue reading

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Arnott’s Living Pictures – Edna May McEnerney -“Adaville” – Victoria Street Erskineville

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Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate Friday, 2 June 1916

The lovely daughter of Mrs. McEnerney made her appearance as ‘An Arnott’s Milk Arrowroot Biscuits Girl’ in 1916. Advertisements featuring young Edna May McEnerney appeared in newspapers around Australia from about May 1916 to May 1917 (and once more in October 1917). More than a dozen appearances have been identified. Continue reading

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Mrs. Lane’s Prize-winning Passionfruit Delight

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In 1946 Mrs. A. Lane, of 33 Rochford Street Erskineville submitted her recipe for Passionfruit Delight to a weekly competition held by the Truth newspaper within its ‘Making Good Wives Better’ section. For her efforts, Mrs. Lane came third, missing out on the £3 first prize to a recipe for Liver and Onion Pudding; and missing out on the £1 second prize to a recipe for Plum Charlotte; coming away with the admiration of the Truth readership and 10 shillings:

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Truth (Sydney) Sunday, 24 February 1946

As I have previously shown, despite not being much of a cook (nor a housewife) I hope Mrs. Lane and the Truth readership do not mind if I don the apron on this occasion and make an attempt at Mrs. Lane’s recipe.

Passionfruit Delight
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Posted in 1940-1949, Rochford Street, Truth Newspaper | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Larrikin Disturbance at Erskineville – the Macdonaldtown Push

 ‘A rowdy gang meet their match’

Erskineville, May 1898:

The lower part of Erskineville, formerly known as Macdonaldtown, has long been troubled by a gang of larrikins known as the “Macdonaldtown Push,” says the Sydney Daily Telegraph of the 17th instant. The character of the suburban “pushes” varies a good deal, but this particular division of larrikins is described by the police as one of the worst of all.

Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld) Wednesday, 25 May 1898

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Reports published on Monday 16 May 1898 and in the days and weeks that followed told the story of an ‘affray with larrikins’ on the streets of Erskineville, near the railway bridge at Macdonald Street. The disturbance is reported to have occurred at half-past 11 on the evening of Saturday 14 May 1898. Constable Daniel McKelvey, newly transferred from Redfern to Newtown confronted the miscreants, and ordered them to move on. Continue reading

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Eden Terrace – 10 to 14 Charles Street Erskineville

Eden Terrace (10 to 14 Charles Street Erskineville) is located on the eastern side of Charles Street (known as George Street prior to 1912), between the railway line and Albert Street. Originally a row of seven two-storey terraces, three remain today. Continue reading

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Chasing the Fox: Sly grog in 1930s Erskineville and Alexandria

chasing-the-fox-sly-grog-in-1930s-erskineville-and-alexandria

On Saturday 8 October 2016 City of Sydney Historian, Dr Lisa Murray will present ‘Chasing the Fox: Sly grog in 1930s Erskineville and Alexandria’ at 2.00pm, following the City of Sydney Historical Association (COSHA) Annual General Meeting at 1.30pm at the Lord Mayor’s Reception Room, Sydney Town Hall.

From the City of Sydney Historical Association website:

The razor gangs of Surry Hills and their female figureheads – Kate Leigh and Tilley Devine – have gained notoriety in 21st century popular culture as the epitome of Sydney’s organised crime. But local crims in Erskineville and Alexandria were equally notorious and violent. City Historian Lisa Murray will share some of her latest research on gambling, sly-grog and crime in the suburbs of Erskineville and Alexandria, drawing upon the City’s oral history collection.

City of Sydney Historical Association members free, visitors $5.

More information available from the Royal Australian Historical Society here, or follow the event’s facebook page.

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